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Home > Home Articles > Homepage News > #ThePositivityExperiment (Week 6 of 6)

#ThePositivityExperiment


During Lent we are inviting us all into an experiment. Not just to fast negativity, but to be a more positive influence on our city, our work places and our neighbourhoods.

Over the six weeks of Lent, can what we think, what we say and what we do, have a clear and noticeable impact on Bristol and all of us who live here?

Each week different writers will share some ideas to encourage you along the way.
 


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#ThePositivityExperiment (Week 6 of 6)


Imagine an interview on the radio where a politician puts their hands up and says ‘You know what, you are right, we got it wrong’.  It’s not very likely, is it?!  And it’s not just politicians.  Most of us will struggle at some point in our livesto admit that we’ve got it wrong or behaved badly.

A former Archbishop of Canterbury has written about the importance of error saying “to recognise misperception is to learn; to learn is to reimagine or reconceive the self”.  And, he adds, all of this has “something to do with God” as we come to terms with our own frailty and dependence.

THINK:  About a time recently where you got it wrong or behaved badly and ask yourself what you might have learn tfrom it?

SPEAK:  Take the opportunity with a friend or close confidante to speak about the times when you have messed up.  Honest confession is a great healer!

ACT:  Go out of your way to communicate to others that even when we don’t cover ourselves in glory each new day is a gift.

Revd Canon Dr. Martin Gainsborough
Chaplain to the Bishop of Bristol


Share your thoughts and ideas on social media using #ThePositivityExperiment #Bristol

 

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#ThePositivityExperiment (Week 5 of 6)


Moral and political leaders have often quoted “all that is necessary for evil to succeed is for good people to do nothing.” Similarly Martin Luther King wrote from Birmingham Jail that the church should not be merely a thermometer that recorded the ideas and principles of popular opinion; but a thermostat that transformed the customs and conventions of society.

These words are pertinent to us today on a national and global scale. But they’re also relevant to us in the minutiae of everyday life. Our thoughts, words and actions can change atmospheres and behaviours in our homes, communities, places of work and learning.

THINK. Where are our thoughts negatively shaped by those around us? Without denying the difficulties cultivate a mind-set that includes mercy, forgiveness and hope in every situation.

SPEAK. Rather than, like a thermometer just using the language of those around you, gently warm the temperature through speaking words of kindness, encouragement and hope.

ACT. Surprise others by acting with unusual initiative and gentleness, overcoming problems with creative solutions.

Chris Bond, Hope Chapel


Share your thoughts and ideas on social media using #ThePositivityExperiment #Bristol
 

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#ThePositivityExperiment (Week 4 of 6)


A few years ago, my husband and son climbed Mount Kilimanjaro. On the final day, some from the group started to question whether they could reach the summit. My son was the one to say “of course we can- think how far we’ve come already”.. and they did manage to complete the climb. 

I had to have surgery recently and I definitely needed encouragement from the nurse to walk down the corridor the next day. And I did it. Encouragement can make such a difference in people’s lives!

THINK: Think about a time in your life when someone really encouraged you in some way, whether big or small, and think about the difference it made to you.

SPEAK: Rather than speaking out negatively, or criticising, as we sometimes do, speak encouragingly to someone instead- whether it’s someone you know well or who you hardly know but want to encourage in some way.

ACT: Do an act of kindness this week to show that there are kind and encouraging people out there! Even if it’s a small thing, it will make a difference.

Nikki Pollard, Fishponds Baptist Church


Share your thoughts and ideas on social media using #ThePositivityExperiment #Bristol


positivity experiment 3


#ThePositivityExperiment (Week 3 of 6)

 

We all know everyone loves a good story but what if I was to say to you that everyone HAS a good story. That all around us there are a great collection of untold adventures that can encourage and give a sense of hope.

And one of the big reasons we don’t hear them so much is that we don’t give those stories ‘airtime’. They get smothered up in all the negative ones. They get overlooked by a sense of rushing around from place to place. 

So this week.

THINK. Take time and create some space in your busy schedule. Allow God to remind you of YOUR OWN STORY. Give thanks for that grace and mercy on your life.

SPEAK. Let that awareness change the way you speak to YOURSELF but obviously outwardly towards OTHERS as well. This week speak words of kindness internally and externally.

ACT. Time is always a challenge but GO OUT OF YOUR WAY to find the time to deeply and fully LISTEN to someone else’s story. 

Colse Leung  (BristolThreads) 

Share your thoughts and ideas on social media using #ThePositivityExperiment #Bristol





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#ThePositivityExperiment (Week 2 of 6)
 

One of the most powerful things the world shares is the universal smile. A smile can cut through all barriers. It knows no age, gender, colour or culture. No matter where you are in the world, what language you speak, or social status, a smile will always be understood. 

When we smile, it makes those around us feel good, happy and loved. It’s difficult to frown when someone is smiling at you! It’s even scientifically proven. You know what they say, “smile and the world smiles with you.” (cited from beliefnet.com)

THINK.  Think about how smiling benefits you – it is proven to help relieve stress and builds better relationships with others.

SPEAK.  Give compliments and positive encouragement to others around you.

ACT.  Make a conscious effort to smile at work, at school or even to someone that you don’t know- you may be saving a life!

- Natalie Ipinyomi (God's House International Centre Bristol)

Share your thoughts and ideas on social media using #ThePositivityExperiment #Bristol
 

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#ThePositivityExperiment (Week 1 of 6)



Lent is a natural time to examine ourselves and think about the kind of people we want to be. At the same time we are aware of a world riddled with negativity that desperately needs God’s love - in thought, in word and in action.
 
So during Lent we are inviting us all into an experiment. Not just to fast negativity, but to be a more positive influence on our city, our work places and our neighbourhoods.
 
Over the six weeks of Lent, can what we think, what we say and what we do have a clear and noticeable impact on Bristol and all of us who live here? Each week different writers will share some ideas to encourage you along the way.
 
Share your thoughts and ideas on social media using #ThePositivityExperiment #Bristol
 
 
Last week in Northern Ireland, Prince William appealed to the British people to "Come together for the common good" in what the tabloids took to be a 'thinly veiled reference to Brexit'. There is no doubt that our country is deeply divided at the moment - and the way in which people speak to and about each other has become more and more unpleasant.
 
The period of six weeks leading up to Easter is known as Lent and is often associated with giving things up - so this Lent how about giving up negativity and deciding instead to take up a more positive attitude to yourself and to others! Each week a different leader in the city will offer a challenge to think, speak and act more positively. 
 
 
THINKAt the end of each day this week, look back at some of the ways that people have helped you and pick out one person in particular whose kindness you are especially thankful for.
 
SPEAK. Take the opportunity to say something to them (either in person, or with a card or an email) to show you appreciate them and what they have done for you.
 
ACTDo something for someone else each day that reflects the kindness you received the day before.

Rod Symmons (Area Dean for City of Bristol)